3rd DELTA Project Workshop

We had another stimulating discussion on the concept/practice of ELSI in the 3rd workshop of Project DELTA last week. The two guest speakers this time were Assoc. Profs. Satoshi Kodama at Graduate School of Letters, Kyoto University and Kenichi Natsume of Humanities and Social Sciences Program at Kanazawa Institute of Technology. They both have expertise in ‘ethics’ concerning science and technology – bioethics and engineering ethics, respectively – and the idea was to explore the scope of ‘ethical (E)’ of ELSI.

Prof. Kodama asked in his talk why the program of the US Human Genome Project was and still is called ‘ELSI’ research program, rather than that of ‘ethics’ or ‘bioethics,’ suggesting the need to understand the political background of its original conception. He further highlighted how it was imported later in other contexts, including nanotechnology, neuroscience, and genomics in Japan. The visionary work of Prof. Hisatake Kato (Kyoto Univ.) in the mid-1990s and that of Prof. Akira Akabayashi (Univ. of Tokyo) in the early 2000s cannot be overlooked in this regard. He also mentioned about struggle of those who involved in ELSI practice and their trouble of being clear about exactly what they were expected to do. Prof. Natsume then talked about the history of engineering ethics in Japan and how it related to the necessity to secure a professional status of university-trained engineers in the country. Education on engineering ethics became compulsory in Japan only when its accreditation system for engineers was established in the late 1990s. Because engineering ethics stresses liability of individual engineers for damage caused by their products, he suggested that it might not be an appropriate framework to deal with issues like dual use, which is more to do with how authorities classify such products.

A common theme of these two kinds of ethics is their emphasis on anticipation. One of the tasks of ELSI research program was to anticipate (often unintended) implications of human genome research and put in place a mechanism to safeguard society from them, even though that could involve banning a specific line of the research. Engineering ethics also demands professional engineers to anticipate both positive and negative consequences of what they make and mitigate the negative ones as much as possible. This makes professional engineers liable for only the damage that could be anticipated in advance. Therefore, engineers’ liability stops where their capability to anticipate ends. The question is whether the same can be said for genomics scientists. A key difference seems that in the case of genomics research, anticipation work is done collectively, instead of individually, often involving elaborated social-science methods. This is so regardless of ELSI researchers themselves feeling that way. Therefore, individual scientists would not have to be liable for the damage that their work causes, while ELSI researchers might be blamed for not whistleblowing in time or failing to anticipate it in advance. From this perspective, having ELSI research program along with the core scientific research could serve as a mechanism to free scientists from concerns that they would have to if they do the same research individually.

In the workshop, we discussed the possibility that this collective protection of scientists actually was one of the vital roles of ELSI research/practice. And if so, ELSI might not be the right tool for the job where ‘the job’ is to invite scientists to work with other non-scientific professionals and make them more socially responsive as well as socially responsible. This relates to another point we discussed, which was the significance of ‘S’ in ELSI. If ‘E’ is sufficiently broad to reflect the existing societal/cultural values, why do we still have to have ‘social’ in it? A suggestion made in line with the role of ELSI research/practice described above was that ELSI was not ‘ethical, legal, and social issues’ but was ‘issues to be examined by ethicists, legal scholars, and social scientists.’ ELSI research program has generated a large stream of research fund for these scholars and built their cluster in the US, and possibly the situation has been similar in Europe. That has at least allowed them to challenge and in some cases modify the role they were assigned. In contrast, the fact that there are only few scholars actively working in the ELSI domain in Japan might be contributing to the problem that we find with its current situation. The intensive discussion in the workshop convinced us (or only me?) that our proposal of ‘Deliberation of Ethical, Legal, and Technical Arrangements (DELTA)’ would have to take a radically different approach to achieve its goal.

ー日本語(Japanese ver.)ー

第3回 「ELSI概念の再構築」研究会開催

「ELSI概念の再構築」プロジェクトは先週第3回研究会を開催し、非常に実りの多い議論を行うことができた。今回の話題提供者は京都大学大学院文学研究科倫理学研究室の児玉聡准教授と金沢工業大学基礎教育学部の夏目賢一准教授のお二人で、それぞれが科学・技術に関わる異なる倫理の専門家(生命倫理と技術者倫理)であり、「ELSI」の中でも特に「E(Ethical)」に焦点を当てることが今回の目的であった。

児玉先生のお話は、まず米国ヒトゲノム計画で始められたELSI研究プログラムはなぜ単に倫理(ethics)あるいは生命倫理(bioethics)ではなく「ELSI」とされたのかという疑問から出発し、その背景にある文脈についてきちんと理解する必要性が強調するものであった。また、「ELSI」という考えがその後ナノテクノロジー研究や脳科学、そして日本のゲノム研究で採用された流れについても触れていただき、日本国内で広義の生命倫理を浸透させた学術的取り組みとして、当時京都大学にいた加藤尚武氏や東京大学でCBELを立ち上げた赤林朗氏の活動について把握する必要があるとのご提案もいただいた。さらに、これまでの国内におけるELSIの議論を追ってみた場合、その中核にいた人々でさえも自分たちが求められている役割が何なのかについて確信を持てずにいた側面もあるのではないかというご指摘もあった。

夏目先生には技術者倫理についてその歴史的経緯を踏まえてご解説いただいた。もともと大学工学部の卒業生について、その専門家としての立場を確立するために海外と同様の資格制度が必要とされ、その導入に際して技術者倫理が組み込まれたこと、そしてその射程は個人が予測出来る範囲で自身が関わった技術に対する責任を追うこととなっていることなどは非常に示唆的であった。また、そのような背景を含めて考えると、技術者倫理は近年取り上げられているデュアルユースの問題などに対応する枠組みとして必ずしも適切ではないのでないのではというご指摘も頂いた。

今回議論の参考とした二つの科学・技術に関わる倫理の共通点として、予測の重要性というのが挙げられる。ELSI研究プログラムの目的はヒトゲノムを解読することで懸念される問題を事前に予測し、社会を守ることであった。一方、技術者倫理でも技術者は正と負の両方の影響について予測し、負の影響に対しては責任を負うこととされている。ただし、ここで重要となるのは、技術者は予測することが可能な範囲でのみ損害に対する責任を負うという点である。同様のことがゲノム研究にもあてはまるか考えてみると、ELSI研究プログラムの存在によって、予測は研究者個人ではなく研究者集団としてなされることとなり、社会科学などの様々な手法を駆使することが求められるという点で大きく異なるのである。そして、このことは責任も個人ではなく集団として負うことにつながる。したがって、科学研究と平行してELSI研究プログラムが実施されたことによって、そこに関わる研究者を個人研究であれば負わなくてはいけないはずの責務から解き放つことができるのである。

研究会では、これこそがELSI研究プログラムが考案された重要な役割の1つではないかという議論があった。そして、もしそうだとするならば、科学者あるいは技術開発者に他の専門家との協働を促し、望むべき社会の実現に向けた研究・開発を求めるという目的とELSIは根本的に適合しないという可能性が出てくる。また、もう1つ、ELSIの「S(Social)」はどういう意味を持っているのかという議論もあった。生命倫理は社会における価値観を反映する議論としての広義の捉え方もあり、あえて「社会」を繰り返す必要があったのだろうか。1つの考え方として、ELSIは「科学技術の倫理的・法的・社会的課題」ではなく、「倫理学者・法学者・社会科学者(社会学者)によって検討がなされるべき科学技術の側面」のこととして理解すべきというものがある。米国や欧州では大きな研究予算の配分が行われたため、実際に携わるそのような研究者達が科学・技術研究と切り離された位置づけを変化させることができた。だが日本ではELSI領域で活躍する研究者の数は限られており、研究のための予算も少ないため、与えられた枠組みの中での活動に留まっているという状況なのかもしれない。

いずれにせよ、今回の研究会における議論を通じて「DELTA」として目指す方向性はこれまでの「ELSI」とは一線を画す必要があることが再認識することができた。内容の濃い議論にお付き合いいただいたお二人の話題提供者、そしてその他の参加者の皆様にも改めて感謝したい。

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s